22 December 2015

Lingering Doubts - Going inside Brisbane's Arcade Murder

Through our promotion of Lingering Doubts we continue to meet the most amazing and interesting people. We thank, from the bottom of our hearts, everybody who has supported our efforts to re-present this tragic story. We also thank you for your encouraging feedback. It means so much!
We wish you all a very Merry Christmas and a happy and healthy 2016.

Today we were kept busy signing copies of our book at Angus & Robertson, Post Office Square, in Brisbane's CBD. On Sunday we were delighted to share our story with customers at Angus & Robertson, Brookside Shopping Centre.


Deb and Jan

2 December 2015

Lingering Doubts - Returning to Angus & Robertson Post Office Square, Brisbane

We are looking forward to returning to Adelaide Street to share the story of the 1947 Arcade Murder - as the crime scene was just around the corner in Albert Street.
Many thanks to Boolarong Press and Angus and Robertson, Post Office Square, Brisbane.
Deb and Jan

27 November 2015

NetK - Criminal Convictions may need Reviewing

The NetK (Miscarriages of Justice) link below will show, what we believe to be, an important article indicating that there are possibly 400 criminal convictions which may need to be reviewed in South Australia because of the defective work of Dr Manock.
It indicates that Maurice Blackburn, Australia's largest class action lawyers are on the job, and maybe have dozens of cases lining up for review.
 (Information provided by Dr Robert N Moles) 
 

17 November 2015

Lingering Doubts - Angus & Robertson, P.O. Square, Brisbane

Technically Queen Street is the address of the Post Office Square Angus and Robertson, however, this amazingly busy bookshop faces Adelaide Street - which proved to be an ideal location for us to raise the subject of Brisbane's Arcade Murder. The Wallace Bishop Arcade - scene of the 68 year old crime - was just around the corner in Albert Street. In fact a witness to the multitude of screams heard that afternoon in January, 1947 was a tramdriver, stationery for a moment or two, at the traffic lights on the corner of Adelaide and Albert Streets. Important new evidence (see post dated 1/11/2015) has, however, helped explain the very likely source of these screams.
As always our sincere thank you to everyone who takes the time to listen to, or read, the disturbing story of Lingering Doubts - Going inside Brisbane's Arcade Murder. 
Many thanks to Copyright Publishing, Boolarong Press and Lesley from Angus and Robertson for organising our 12 November book signing.
We so appreciate every opportunity granted to us whereby we can present the details of how, in the space of 8 weeks, our grandfather was arrested and sentenced to life imprisonment for the murder of his 19 year old typist - primarily due to the investigative evidence of the, now known to be, corrupt and dangerous Detective Frank Bischof.
Deb and Jan

Janice Teunis

Deb Drummond


14 November 2015

Lingering Doubts - QNS Radio Review

Click here to listen to bookjacket reviews
 A review of Lingering Doubts, alongside a review of The Birdwatcher by William McInnes, was recently aired on QNS radio. Cheryl Jorgensen's insightful and comprehensive 2014 review of Lingering Doubts was chosen for the broadcast.
Cheryl Jorgensen 
Our sincere thank you to all concerned..thrilled to be reviewed alongside the talented William McInnes!
Deb and Jan

5 November 2015

Lingering Doubts Review - November 2015

A wonderful review provided by an interstate reader:


Authors Deb Drummond and Janice Teunis are the grand-daughters of Reginald Brown, convicted of the 1947 murder of his typist Bronia Armstrong in an office above a Brisbane CBD arcade.

The aim of their book ‘Lingering Doubts’ is to shed light on the inconsistencies and flaws of the murder investigation and trial, and provide a balanced view on what happened all those years ago. In this, it succeeds admirably.

Meticulously researched over an eight year period, the book is extremely well-written, with a structure and flow which carry the reader forward. It becomes patently clear that a great deal of evidence supporting Reg Brown’s story was overlooked or suppressed, as once police had decided he was their man, they focused their investigation on this and excluded any evidence which didn’t fit their theory. At the trial, witnesses whose testimony would have supported Mr Brown were never called, and there were major inadequacies in the defence’s handling of their client’s case.

The authors also examine the aftermath of Reg’s conviction and death, and the long-term effects on his family, who were left behind to pick up the pieces. It’s worth noting that the victim of this terrible murder, Bronia Armstrong, and her grieving family, are at all times treated with great respect.
I highly recommend ‘Lingering Doubts.’  -    Nicholas Bunning
  Much appreciated thank you Nick,

Deb and Jan

1 November 2015

Important New Evidence in Brisbane's Arcade Murder Case

Re-posted due to the requests of several readers wishing to know more about the new evidence that has come to light since the publication of Lingering Doubts.

A wonderful lady named Doreen approached us last year with the following information:
 As a young woman Doreen was a visitor to the Wallace Bishop Arcade that Friday afternoon 10 Jan 1947. She said she heard, what she described as, a muffled scream. When she asked the Arcade librarian about the noise, Doreen was informed that the screams had been going on all afternoon; the librarian supposed the rehearsals were taking place across the passageway.
The police said the screams came from Bronia Armstrong when our grandfather attacked her in his office. Witnesses told the court they heard between 2 and 100 screams, depending on who was testifying. Our grandfather, Reg Brown, was the only person on record to speak of amateur radio plays and rehearsals .. the police labelled him a liar.

Did the police in 1947 have the power to conceal this vital information, coach witnesses, manipulate evidence? It now seems manifestly apparent, they did...

Deb and Jan

29 October 2015

Lingering Doubts - Qld. Narrating Service Audio Book

Janice, Deb and Jo Booth from Queensland Narrating Service
Lingering Doubts Audio Book is a first class production! 68 years after Brisbane's Arcade Murder, Narrator Kaye Stevenson's superb storytelling skills has brought our grandfather, Reg Brown, to life - and truly given him his voice. 
  Meet Kaye Stevenson
 Our presentation at the QNS VIP Club was received with much support and interest. Such a beautiful audience. We are delighted that so many people can now listen to our book.
Audio books can be purchased from Queensland Narrating Service website 
 Deb and Jan

13 October 2015

Lingering Doubts - Going inside Brisbane's Arcade Murder - Audio Book

Matthew Condon (Three Crooked Kings, Jacks and Jokers, All Fall Down) kindly recommended our book to the Queensland Narrating Service. Consequently the audio conversion of Lingering Doubts is almost ready for release. What an absolute honour on both accounts - thank you to Matt and thank you to Jo and all who are associated with QNS.

20 September 2015

Lingering Doubts - Book signing Little Gnome

What an interesting group discussion we had at Wynnum's Little Gnome Bookshop recently.  All present were extraordinarily privileged to have Ken Blanch, true crime author and former journalist, stop by with his daughter Kelyn. Ken's personal and disturbing knowledge of Detective Frank Bischof's ethics, in fact his lack of any conscience whatsoever, left us saddened and disgusted but gave us another reason to believe our grandfather was innocent. 

Ken Blanch - Review of Lingering Doubts (3 May, 2015)
Lingering Doubts, going inside Brisbane's Arcade Murder provides compelling evidence for the modus operandi of unscrupulous police in mid-20th century Queensland.

What they did in those days was identify a suspect through circumstances and then try to fit the evidence to their suspicions.  This led to false conclusions and to the obfuscation of the real facts.

In the old Queensland police force, advancement was very much as a result of success and those seeking it very often were not concerned with how their achievements came about.

Not only did police actively seek evidence that would damage the suspect, they also actively ignored anything that might be in the suspect's favour.  This sometimes led to vigorous protection of wrongdoers in the interests of the police and/or politicians.

 I have demonstrated this in my recent bookette, Marjorie Norval: the girl a railway station swallowed, about the disappearance of Marjorie Norval in 1938, nine years earlier than Reg Brown's case. 

Frank Bischof was involved in investigating that case too. He often boasted to me privately, when I was chief crime reporter for the old Brisbane Telegraph and he headed the CIB during the 1950s, of how he resorted to trickery to disadvantage suspects and even obtain questionably incriminating admissions from them  (now known more popularly among police as verballing).

Deb Drummond and Janice Teunis' analysis of likely alternatives for the assumptions police made according to circumstance in their investigation of Bronia Armstrong's death has been thorough and enlightening, and well and truly justifies the title. Congratulations.

30 August 2015

Lingering Doubts presented at RHSQ Event

Click to see Murder and Mayhem program
 At the invitation of The Royal Historical Society of Queensland Deb presented the story of the Arcade Murder to an inquisitive audience at Brisbane's magnificently restored Commissariat Store Museum in William Street. The program included talks on several other historic and equally tragic murders and also the launch of a new Archaeology Exhibition. The showcased artifacts are amazing! 
We are excited that so many people in the audience had previously read Lingering Doubts and knew the story. 
Many thanks to the members of the RHSQ not only for our invitation to share our grandfather's story but also for preserving this beautiful building. The original Commissariat Store was built by convicts in 1828-29.
History of Commissariat Store
Deb and Jan

25 August 2015

Judgement in R v Beckett

Monday 24 August, 2015
This is an important case on compensation for wrongful conviction. Judgment to be delivered at the Darlinghurst Supreme Court. It should provide some interesting clarification of the proper principles to be applied in such cases.

Robert N Moles
Networked Knowledge

 BREAKING NEWS:  Roseanne Beckett (Catt) has been awarded compensation for wrongful imprisonment. Justice at last but why has this taken so long?
(See previous post to read the recent address given by Malcolm McCusker QC on miscarriages of justice in this country).

Well done Roseanne! As we always say there is no expiry date on truth and justice.

 Deb and Jan

12 August 2015

Miscarriages of Justice - Malcolm McCusker QC

This is a link to the recent speech by Malcolm McCusker QC to the Anglo-Australian Lawyers Society in Perth.
It includes the suggestion that there may well be some 400 cases in South Australia which will need to be re-examined in the light of recent events.
As the person who has been the former Governor of Western Australia for the last few years, and an eminent senior counsel, his reflections should certainly be taken seriously.  
The speech is available at: http://netk.net.au/MOJGeneral/MOJ4.pdf

Robert N Moles
Networked Knowledge
Web: http://netk.net.au

8 August 2015

16 July 2015

Lingering Doubts - Bayside Star July 2015

Excerpt from the Bayside Star 15/7/2015



Photo taken in Wynnum's vibrant new book and coffee shop,
Little Gnome.

There will be a book signing at Little Gnome
on Sunday 16/8/2015 from 2 pm


Deb and Jan

9 July 2015

Lingering Doubts at Little Gnome

A welcome request from Bel at Wynnum's Little Gnome Bookstore - ''more copies of Lingering Doubts please!''
We're very much looking forward to meeting everyone at the book signing - from 2.00 pm on 16 August, 2015.
Deb and Jan
 

8 July 2015

Lingering Doubts returns to Regatta Hotel

Winterford descendants meet at the Regatta Hotel

Today the Westside News ran an article on the Winterford family reunion held in the Winterford Room at the Regatta Hotel on Coronation Drive, Toowong. 

As many people now know, Lingering Doubts has a strong connection to this gracious and iconic Brisbane landmark. Firstly, we are great-great-granddaughters of William and Margaret Winterford. Secondly, we were kindly given access to private rooms at the Regatta for interview and research purposes during the book writing process. And last, but not least, the Winterford Room swelled when over 200 guests gathered for the launch of Lingering Doubts in March 2014. 

Our launch was a celebration on so many levels - the culmination of years of work, respected veteran investigative reporter Bob Bottom travelling from NSW as guest speaker and the presence of Ian (Deb's Dad) and Valerie (Jan's Mum), both Winterford great-grandchildren. Ian and Valerie braced themselves as their father's story once again entered the public arena. It was a miracle that Ian witnessed the book's release as only four months later he suffered a major stroke during surgery. Valerie's health too has declined but, as has been proven throughout their lives, this courageous brother and sister have inherited William Winterford's indomitable spirit.

It's extraordinary that descendants of our grandfather's wife's family are now reading about his questionable 1947 murder conviction. Some had heard rumours but generally older family members would not speak of it. In fact they knew very little. Lingering Doubts has given our grandfather a voice - although this was our sole aim we never dreamed it would reach so many. 

A sincere thank you to all our readers.

Deb and Jan


7 July 2015

Lingering Doubts available at Rosetta Books, Maleny

Thank you to Anne for agreeing to carry Lingering Doubts

Rosetta Books, a warm and inviting book store, is located on Maple Street, in beautiful Maleny. 


( image courtesy Salt Magazine / Claire Push ) 
Visit Salt Magazine to read their review on Rosetta Books!

30 Maple St, Maleny
ph: 07 5435 2134

Deb and Jan

28 June 2015

Photos from Winterford Family Reunion - Regatta Hotel

Reunion organiser, Sharon Racine (left) and Deb sharing UK family member Stephen Winterford's words

Jan's Mum, Valerie (Brown) Herbertson, signing Lingering Doubts for Sue Winterford

Deb's sister, Faye (Brown) Gibson, looking elegant in Victorian dress

A splendid day at the lovely Regatta Hotel. Winterford descendants came from all parts of Australia and our UK and Canadian relations were there in spirit also. Unfortunately my Dad, Ian Brown, was unable to attend due to the stroke he suffered last year. Jan couldn't join us either as husband, John, is scheduled for surgery this week. Lots of love and best wishes are being sent his way.

Deb

25 June 2015

Winterford Family Reunion - Winterford Room, Regatta Hotel

Winterford's Far & Wide - Facebook group

The above Facebook group, compliments of Stephen Winterford from the UK, welcomes all descendants of our amazing great-great-grandparents, William and Margaret Winterford, who built and owned the iconic Regatta Hotel on Coronation Drive, Toowong.

In March 2014 Lingering Doubts was launched in the Regatta's Winterford Room  and on Saturday 27 June 2015 a Winterford family reunion will be held in the same room. This will be the first Winterford family gathering with many members meeting for the very first time.
Our thanks to Sharon Racine who single-handedly organised this gathering of the Winterford clan.

Deb and Jan

16 June 2015

Lingering Doubts now available at Wynnum's Little Gnome Bookshop

Deb delivering Lingering Doubts to Little Gnome

Little Gnome bookshop, which also serves great coffee, is located in Florence Street, Wynnum - two streets away from where Jan grew up.

Find Little Gnome at 5/66 Florence St
ph: 07 3161 9931

Many thanks Bel and Jack,
Deb and Jan

5 June 2015

Lingering Doubts - Going inside Brisbane's Arcade Murder soon in Audio Format

Later this year an audio version of Lingering Doubts will be available for the vision impaired and print-disabled community! Needless to say we were thrilled to receive this extraordinary offer from Jo Booth, Queensland Narrating Service - a non-profit community organisation currently funded by Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services.   

For many years QNS has had a close relationship with University of Queensland Press, among other publishers, and has produced many of their titles in audio format for the libraries. Jo advised that QNS tends to focus on Australian and in particular local Queensland content. 

Our story was kindly recommended to QNS by Matthew Condon (Three Crooked Kings) and Breanda Cross, a volunteer narrator. Our grandfather's voice will now be heard by many more people. Many thanks Matt, Breanda and Jo.

Deb and Jan

29 May 2015

Lingering Doubts - Going inside Brisbane's Arcade Murder - Where to buy?

Available at the following outlets:
  • Annie's Books on Peregian, Peregian Beach
  • Avid Reader, West End
  • Books of Buderim, 82 Burnett Street, Buderim
  • Caboolture Park News, King Street, Caboolture
  • Little Gnome, Florence Street, Wynnum
  • Mary Ryan's, Park Road, Milton
  • Nook and Cranny, Goondiwindi                                                               
  • Paddington Antique Centre, Stall 12
  • Pulp Fiction Books, 144 Adelaide Street, Brisbane
  • Riverbend Books, Bulimba
  • St. George Newsagency, St George
  • State Library Bookshop, SLQ, South Bank
  • The River Read, Noosaville
Or to buy now click 'Buy the Book' to the top right of the screen 
Lingering Doubts 
Deb and Jan

27 May 2015

Lingering Doubts - 68 years ago - Coronial Inquest - Part 10

27 May, 1947

Our grandfather's body was found in a Boggo Road Gaol cell just 9 days into his life sentence. Five weeks later -  68 years ago today - an inquest was held in Brisbane. City Coroner, Thomas Elite, heard evidence from Dr John Tonge - State Pathologist, one police constable, four prison officers and Reg Brown's 20 year-old son, Ian.

Ian told the inquiry that only four days before his father's death, he had visited him in Boggo Road Gaol. Although Reg warned his son not to 'get off side with the police, you will never win' and described the prison as 'worse than you could ever imagine', Ian said there were no good-byes, nothing to indicate his father was considering suicide. In the courtroom environment Ian was shown, for the first time, his father's last words; a final and concise statement of innocence written and signed in pencil on a piece of gaol issued toilet paper.

Each prison warden, one of whom we actually met during our research, gave their testimony regarding the prisoner's final days; each concluded with, 'He never said or done anything which might suggest to me that he was going to take his own life.'

Although our grandfather was unwell and had been prescribed Phenobarbital by the prison doctor, the doctor did not appear at the inquest. At the end of one hour and forty minutes the coroner ruled no suspicious circumstances. But as we show in Lingering Doubts, there are  some reasons for suspicion. Unanswered questions remain e.g. was our grandfather in an observation cell? We were told there was some contention over this matter amongst prison staff. Also was Reg assessed by the medical officer after receiving a life sentence? He was distressed, still professing his innocence and subsequently suffered a severe asthma attack. Even so, he wrote a heartfelt letter to his equally distraught wife and family.

Adding to the heartbreak, Bronia Armstrong should have celebrated her 20th birthday on 26 May - the day before the inquest. If things had been different, yesterday in 2015 Bronia might have celebrated her 88th birthday, perhaps surrounded by her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

In a strange twist of fate my (Deb's) gorgeous granddaughter turned 1 year old yesterday - 26 May.

Deb and Jan

12 May 2015

Lingering Doubts - Crown witness found!


Some wonderful news!  
We have finally found Rhonda Tasker, long-ago friend of Bronia Armstrong and Crown Witness at our grandfather’s trial. 

For many years we have searched unsuccessfully for Rhonda, the 17 year old girl who, in 1947, worked on the stocking counter at Finney’s, a department store in Queen Street, Brisbane. 

On the Saturday Bronia’s body was discovered at the Wallace Bishop Arcade, the girls were due to leave for a weekend together at bayside Margate. Much anticipated plans that, sadly, were not to be. 

So how did we finally locate Rhonda? We certainly didn’t do it alone. Unexpected help came from Kelyn, recent reader of Lingering Doubts and daughter of Ken Blanch (see post below). Kelyn kindly blessed us with her incredible genealogy tracing skills! Many thanks to you Kelyn – not only for your generous assistance but for your interest in our grandfather’s story.

Thankfully, 68 years after the death of Bronia Armstrong, and our grandfather’s arrest for her murder, a now elderly Rhonda has indicated her willingness to help us if she is able. We are also indebted to Rhonda’s son for his understanding and assistance. 

A special thank you to a family member from Melbourne who alerted us to Ken Blanch's recent publication - which ultimately led us to Rhonda 

Deb and Jan


3 May 2015

Lingering Doubts - wise words from Ken Blanch - true crime author and former crime reporter



For Lingering Doubts website from Ken Blanch


Lingering Doubts, going inside Brisbane's Arcade murder provides compelling evidence for the modus operandi of unscrupulous police in mid-20th century Queensland.

What they did in those days was identify a suspect through circumstances and then try to fit the evidence to their suspicions.  This led to false conclusions and to the obfuscation of the real facts.

In the old Queensland police force, advancement was very much as a result of success and those seeking it very often were not concerned with how their achievements came about.

Not only did police actively seek evidence that would damage the suspect, they also actively ignored anything that might be in the suspect's favour.  This sometimes led to vigorous protection of wrongdoers in the interests of the police and/or politicians.

 I have demonstrated this in my recent bookette, Marjorie Norval: the girl a railway station swallowed, about the disappearance of Marjorie Norval in 1938, nine years earlier than Reg Brown's case. 

Frank Bischof was involved in investigating that case too. He often boasted to me privately, when I was chief crime reporter for the old Brisbane Telegraph and he headed the CIB during the 1950s, of how he resorted to trickery to disadvantage suspects and even obtain questionably incriminating admissions from them  (now known more popularly among police as verballing).

Deb Drummond and Janice Teunis' analysis of likely alternatives for the assumptions police made according to circumstance in their investigation of Bronia Armstrong's death has been thorough and enlightening, and well and truly justifies the title. Congratulations.

(Marjorie Norval: The girl a railway station swallowed is available from Seagle Crime Stories at www.seaglecrimestories.com)

++++
Thank you Ken, we value your opinion and truly appreciate your words. 
What a fantastic service you are performing by continuing to put pen to paper, your professionalism and first hand knowledge of how things were in old Brisbane, make your books an invaluable resource.

Deb and Jan